The Brief History of Nike Shoes

Nike shoes have various styles and colors. They can be worn by professionals and daily walkers who like to make a fashion statement. You can easily find Nike stores in your area. The Nike swoosh logo has been considered as one of the most recognized company logos in the world now.

This special logo was originally designed in 1971 by a student who studied graphic design at Portland State University. They paid the girl only $35 for the fabulous design but some sources also say that Phil Knight, the co-founder of Nike, later gave her a diamond ring engraved with the logo she designed as well as an unknown amount of Nike stock. It is interesting that Knight was not very impressed with her work the first time, like what he said, “I don’t love it, but it will grow on me.”

Today, there have been more than 30,000 people employed by Nike around the world. Nike also provides other sports gear besides shoes. The company is under some scrutiny recently for the issues concerned with human rights and poor working environment. Official statistic shows that only in 2008, Nike has made a net income of approximate $1.9 billion dollars. The name Nike comes from the Greek goddess of victory. As a matter of fact, like many other famous companies, Nike also had a humble condition at the beginning. All of the original founders are used to be athletes and they have been running it for more than 50 years till now.

In fact, the duo first sold the shoes manufactured by a Japanese factory but in very short time they ended the relationship with the Japanese company in 1971. Afterwards, they started to improve their own line of footwear made mostly for football and decided to call it the name Nike. Soon they developed much more lines of shoes. With the development of technique and management, by 1980, abound 50% of shoes sold in the United States had carried the Nike brand. The headquarters the Nike company still locates in Oregon now and owns several subsidiaries such as Umbro and Converse.

Football Boots (Soccer Cleats) The History

Football Boots: Earliest Recorded – King Henry VIII in 1526

King Henry VIII’s football boots were listed within the Great Wardrobe of 1526, a shopping list of the day. They were made by his personal shoemaker Cornelius Johnson in 1525, at a cost of 4 shillings, the equivalent of £100 in today’s money. Little is known about them, as there is no surviving example, but the royal football boots are known to have been made of strong leather, ankle high and heavier than the normal shoe of the day.

Football Boots – The 1800’s

Moving forward 300 years saw football developing and gaining popularity throughout Britain, but still remaining as an unstructured and informal pastime, with teams representing local factories and villages in a burgeoning industrial nation. Players would wear their hard, leather work boots, which were long laced and steel toe-capped as the first football boots. These football boots would also have metal studs or tacks hammered into them to increase ground grip and stability.

As laws become integrated into the game in the late 1800’s, so saw the first shift in football boots to a slipper (or soccus) style shoe, with players of the same team starting to wear the same boots for the first time. Laws also allowed for studs, which had to be rounded. These leather studs, also known as cleats, were hammered into the early football boots, which for the first time moved away from the earlier favoured work boots. These football boots weighed 500g and were made of thick, hard leather going up the ankle for increased protection. The football boots would double in weight when wet and had six studs in the sole. The football boot had arrived…

Football Boots – The 1900’s to 1940’s

Football boot styles remained relatively constant throughout the 1900’s up to the end of the second world war. The most significant events in the football boot world in the first part of the twentieth century were the formation of several football boot producers who are still making football boots today, including Gola (1905), Valsport (1920) and Danish football boot maker Hummel (1923).

Over in Germany, Dassler brothers Adolf and Rudolf formed the Gebrüder Dassler Schuhfabrik (Dassler Brothers Shoe Factory) in Herzogenaurach in 1924 and began producing football boots in 1925 which had 6 or 7 replaceable, nailed studs, which could be changed according to the weather conditions of play.

Football Boots – The 1940’s to 1960’s

Football boot styles shifted significantly after the end of the second world war, as air travel became cheaper and more international fixtures were played. This saw the lighter, more flexible football boot being worn by the South Americans being thrust onto the world stage, and their ball skills and technical ability amazed all those that watched them. Football boot production shifted to producing a lighter football boot with the focus on kicking and controlling the ball rather than simply producing a piece of protective footwear.

1948 saw the formation of the Adidas company by Adolf (Adi) Dassler after a falling out with his brother that was to form the cornerstone of football boot maker rivalry for the preceding years up to today. Brother Rudolf founded the beginnings of the Puma company in 1948, quickly producing the Puma Atom football boot. This led to interchangeable screw in studs made of plastic or rubber for the first time, reputedly by Puma in the early 1950’s but the honour is also claimed by Adidas (Read the Story on Footy-Boots). Football boots of the time were still over the ankle, but were now being made of a mixture of synthetic materials and leather, producing and even lighter shoe for the players of the day to display their skills with.

Football Boots – The 1960’s

The technological developments of the sixties bought a momentous step-change in design which saw the lower cut design introduced for the first time in football history. This change allowed players to move faster and saw the likes of Pele wearing Puma football boots in the 1962 World Cup Finals. Adidas, though, quickly emerged as the market leader, a position it claims until the present day. In the World Cup Finals of 1966, an astonishing 75% of players wore the Adidas football boot.

The 1960’s also saw several other football boot makers joining the market with their own brands and styling including Mitre (1960), Joma (1965) and Asics (1964).

Football Boots – The 1970’s

The seventies began with the iconic 1970 World Cup Finals which saw a sublime Brazilian team lift the trophy with Pele again at the helm, this time wearing the Puma King football boot. The decade itself will be remembered for the way in which football boot sponsorship took off, where players were being paid to wear only one brand. In terms of design and style, technological advancements produced lighter boots, and a variety of colours, including for the first time, the all-white football boot.

In 1979, Adidas produced the world’s best selling football boot the Copa Mundial, built of kangaroo leather and built for speed and versatility. Although Adidas remained dominant, several other football boot makers joined the fray including Italian football boot maker Diadora (1977).

Football Boots – The 1980’s

The greatest development of recent times in the design and technology of football boots was developed in the eighties by former player Craig Johnston, who created the Predator football boot, which was eventually released by Adidas in the 1990’s. Johnston designed the Predator to provide greater traction between football boot and the ball, and football boot and the ground. The design allowed for greater surface areas to come into contact with the ball when being hit by the football boot, with a series of power and swerve zones within the striking area allowing the player to create greater power and swerve when hitting the “sweet spots”. The eighties also saw football boots for the first time being made by English company Umbro (1985), Italy’s Lotto and Spain’s Kelme (1982).

Football Boots – 1990’s

1994 saw Adidas release the Craig Johnston designed Predator with its revolutionary design, styling and technology making it an instant and lasting success. The Predator by now featured polymer extrusion technologies and materials allowing for a more flexible sole as well as the conventional studs being replaced by a bladed design covering the sole, giving a more stable base for the player. In 1995 Adidas released their bladed outsole traxion technology which are tapered shaped blades. Puma hit back in 1996 with a foam-free midsole football boot, known as Puma Cell Technology, to which Adidas responded again, this time with wedge shaped studs in the same year. The nineties saw new football boot producers Mizuno release their Mizuno Wave in 1997. Other new football boots came from Reebok (1992) and Uhlsport (1993) with other companies also joining the ever increasing, lucrative and competitive market place. Most significantly the nineties saw the entry of Nike, the world’s biggest sportswear producer, immediately making an impact with its Nike Mercurial soccer boot (1998), weighing in at just 200g.

Football Boots – 2000+

As technology advanced still further, the application of the new research and developments were seen in the years into the new millennium right up to the present day and this has led to a reinforcement of the market positions of the big three football boot makers and sellers, Puma, Nike and Adidas (incorporating Reebok since 2006). Fortunately, there still remains room in the market place for the smaller producer that does not have the big money endorsement contracts at its disposal, such as Mizuno, Diadora, Lotto, Hummel and Nomis.

Recent developments since 2000 have seen the Nomis Wet control technology producing a sticky boot (2002), the Craig Johnston Pig Boot (2003), shark technology by Kelme (2006) and the exceptional design of the Lotto Zhero Gravity laceless football boots (2006) all of which underpin the successes that these smaller makers can achieve by producing specialised and technologically advanced football boots that provide a distinct differentiation from the mass produced products of the big three. Laser technology has also helped to produce the world’s first fully customised football by Prior 2 Lever, which is perhaps the most exciting and innovative of the recent developments.

Current favourite football boots include Adidas’ F50, Tunit and Predator; Nike’s Mercurial Vapor III, Air Zoom Total 90s and Tiempo Ronaldinho, Reebok Pro Rage and Umbro X Boots.

Football Boots – The Future

As the debate rages with regards the lack of protection given by modern football boots, and the repercussion in terms of player injuries, there seems little to suggest that the major manufacturers are going to give up their quest for the lightest football boot for a more protective one. The proliferation of big money sponsorship deals, namely Nike Ronaldinho, Adidas with David Beckham and Reebok with Thierry Henry, has become a huge factor that drives the success and sales of a football boot maker, but is viewed as at a cost of injury and stagnation in football boot research and development. All we can predict for the future is integration with sensor technology, lighter and more powerful football boots and more outlandish designs and styles.

Football boots have travelled a long way since King Henry strutted onto the fields of England in the 1500’s: the football boot has gone from an everyday protective apparel to a highly designed and cutting edge technological product which is a vital part of the player’s equipment. Whatever the colour, the design, the style or the player – we love footy boots!

History of New Balance Athletic Shoes

New Balance Athletic Shoes, Inc. is an American footwear company based in Boston, Massachusetts. It began existence as New Balance Arch Support Company and exclusively sold arch supports and other shoe accessories. In the 1970’s New Balance expanded to include specialized shoe design. Today New Balance Athletic Shoes, Inc. includes the brands Dunham, PF Flyers, Aravon, Warrior and Brine.

New Balance Arch Support Company got its start in 1906 when William J. Riley, a 33 year old English immigrant to the States, set up shop in Boston, MA. The original company only sold accessories designed to make people’s shoes fit better. Arthur Hall joined the company in 1934. He is largely responsible for designing New Balance’s marketing strategy at that time, which was to advertise New Balance products to people whose jobs required them to spend long hours standing. According to the New Balance website, the company’s primary customers at that time were police officers and waiters who were desperate for orthopedic relief.

Although Riley’s daughter and son-in-law designed the first New Balance tennis shoe in 1961 (it was called the “Trackster”), New Balance did not enjoy success in the arena until the company switched hands to Jim Davis. The handover was well timed. The US was just about to launch into the jogging craze of the 1970s, and Boston was at the epicenter of the storm. In fact, Davis purchased New Balance on the day of the Boston Marathon in 1972.

Before Davis, New Balance consisted of six employees who made roughly 30 pairs of shoes a day. These were specialty shoes designed for customers with specific needs. Davis was able to expand the company while maintaining New Balance’s legacy of first rate service for its customers.

New Balance has experienced a lot of changes in the last few decades. The head of its operations is no longer a Bostonian but a Californian. New Balance factories were opened in England (to accommodate a growing European market) and later in China. But there are a few principles that New Balance tries to keep consistent. First, New Balance still maintains five factories in the United States – a rarity in these days of globalization and cheap labor overseas. Also, New Balance has a strict “Endorsed by No One ” policy that refuses to cater to the bankbooks of celebrity athletes. The company maintains that quality shoes do not need a celebrity spokesperson. In many ways, this is a consumer-friendly policy. After all, 5 dollars of every Nike shoe you buy goes straight into the pocket of Michael Jordan or Tiger Woods.