Italian Shoes Made in China

Most of us don’t associate “Made in China” with luxury brands or designer brands, but the more Italian shoes you like that are actually made in China. You might not find the tag in the shoe saying that.

Especially in the current economic market, sales of luxury goods have declined significantly and some designer brands suffer. One of the most effective ways to cut costs is by moving base operations abroad, and China provides one of the most attractive markets to open stores.

The fact that “American” or “European” shoes made in China is not a secret. Nike has long been associated with “Made in China” shoes; In fact, about one in three Nike shoes are equipped with a “Made in China” sticker. This compromise is more difficult for designer brands like Chanel, Prada and Armani who have built their brand success on “European expertise” through and through. One of the reasons why someone spends 300 extra dollars buying Prada shoes is because they want a European piece of art. They want to believe that what they buy is the real deal – Italian leather shoes built by someone who knows and loves the art of shoe making, not by factory workers in China.

So which company jumped over the continent? Armani, Dolce & Gabbana, Bally and Prada, to name a few brands. But not all of these companies are willing to publicize this new operating base. In fact, in some of these shoes you will find the label “Made in Italy” where maybe the label “Made in China” instead. This is possible thanks to a number of highly flexible labeling laws that base product labels at the end point of production. So shoes made in China will have leather soles installed in Italy and Voila! Legally “Made in Italy” shoes.

That does not mean that these shoes are of poorer quality than when produced in Europe. His claim is that workers in China are fast and precise. That is, they are able to make high quality shoes in less time and with less money.

According to Giorgio Bonacarso – a supplier of chemicals that sells products to Chinese factories that produce Italian shoes – nine out of 10 Italian luxury shoe companies now make at least part of their shoes in China. You, the consumer, might not realize it, and that’s because designer brands are afraid of reactions and loss of images that make them stand out from the pack in the first place.

Getting Exact Performance Running Shoes

What is the best running shoe or cross-trainer for you? Depends on many factors and you need to ask yourself a few questions first. It would be easy to outfit every foot in the world with running shoes for men if every athlete’s feet were exactly the same. Since every foot is different, and every runner or athlete is different, it goes without saying that you need to get the shoe that is just right for you.

Finding the high performance running shoes does not have to be difficult, but you need to ask yourself some questions. What kind of sport you do, where you workout, how many times a week, your age, your relative health, your level of fitness, your dedication to working out, all of these factors come into play when picking out the right running shoes.

Have you lost weight? Are you recovering from a disability? Are you training for the Olympics? This last one is just pie in the sky imagination. If you’re from a backward and poor isolated country, if you are competing for an Olympic medal you will have had your shoes selected for you by a team of scientist, that is unless you are from Kenya and run barefoot. Finding the best running footwear need not be that difficult.

If you are an average American man somewhere between 34 and 56 years of age and you are selecting your running shoes for your early morning jog around the park, then you can probably just go to your local Foot Locker and pick out a pair of Reeboks or Nikes that fit your feet. However, if you’re looking to save money (and who isn’t these days) you can get some of the very same name brand running shoes for women or men at discounters like Nordstrom Rack, Marshalls, Burlington Coat Factory, TJ Maxx, or your neighborhood facsimile to these stores.

Those superstores have gigantic aisles upon aisles of great running and training footwear for you to choose from. It can be hard coming across your size at these places but if you don’t mind the crowd and have some patience, then you could purchase smart bargains. Marshalls, for instance, carries Nikes, New Balance and even some Reeboks, among other off-brands. They also have a nice selection of hiking sandals. Even BJ’s Warehouse has some great shoe bargains, however a light brand selection.

When it comes to running shoes for men, it is all about comfort. I find that the most comfortable shoes are those without back handles because I have found that this cloth handle hits my Achilles every time due to my foot’s shape. If you have a club foot you may want to shop somewhere else. Those with fallen arches may want to consult your foot doctor first or get prescription insoles.

Nike Invents Sneakers from Trash for Nash

Though he may not be as popular as say Michael Jordan in his heyday, it’s probably safe to assume most people recognize the name Steve Nash. A two-time NBA MVP, he’s the guy who looks more like a snowboarder than a basketball player, the one who you’ve probably seen flying down the court at warp speed or firing off a behind-the-back pass without a second of hesitation. Along with being one of the most passionate and intelligent players in the game, he’s also one of the most environmentally conscious – as exhibited by his latest collaboration with Nike.

While Nash joined the ranks of Jordan and other basketball stars who’ve gotten their own signature shoes a couple years ago, his latest shoe offers up something a little different. The Nike Trash Talk is the first performance basketball shoe made from manufacturing waste. That’s right – waste. The Trash Talk is composed from scraps leftover during the production of other sneakers. The upper area of the shoe is created with leather and synthetic leather waste stitched together in a zigzag pattern. The mid-sole area incorporates scrap-ground foam from factory production, while the outsole uses environmentally-preferred rubber. The recycled material is matched with a distinct design that calls attention to the eco-friendly nature of the shoe. Though it looks like it was made for stylistic purposes, the close stitching actually allows for the use of small scraps in making the shoe.

In terms of performance, the shoe is modeled after Nash’s current Nike shoe, the Nike Zoom BB II Low. That shoe is designed specifically for quick, athletic players like Nash and Tony Parker. Described as being “ultra-light” and “ultra-stealthy”, the Nike Zoom BB incorporates Zoom(TM) technology for “quick and deadly court response” (whatever that means). The Trash Talk’s are intended to give players the same performance – with the added benefit of being as easy on the environment as they are on a player’s feet. It’s an addition that seems to fit well with Nash’s personal philosophy. “Any opportunity to promote the environment and preserve our planet is a step in the right direction,” the Phoenix point guard remarked.

Lately, Nike has been making a more concerted effort to incorporate “green” elements into their sneakers. Though not highly touted in its marketing campaign, the most recent pair of Nike Air Jordan’s (the XX3) also were “green” shoes. The XX3s use a minimal amount of adhesives and glues that are considered environmentally unfriendly, instead relying on a system of interlocking panels. Both Nash and Jordan sneakers are products of the new “Nike Considered” initiative. The program challenges designers to use environmentally preferred materials, reduce waste, create sustainable manufacturing processes and use innovation to help reduce overall impact.